Chain Surveying

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Introduction of Chain Surveying

A chain survey is the simplest form of surveying. It is generally used to measure relatively small areas with great accuracy. In a chain survey, linear measurements are made with a chain or tape and angles are measured with an instrument called a theodolite or transit. A chain survey is usually conducted in two phases: (1) a series of linear measurements are made to determine the critical points or corners of the area to be surveyed, and (2) the angles between these lines are measured to determine the size and shape of the area.

Basic Terms Used in Chain Surveying

  • Chain surveying is a relatively simple type of surveying that can be used to measure relatively small areas of land
  • The surveyor uses a chain, typically made of metal, to take measurements
  • The chain is laid out in a straight line, and the surveyor measures the length of the line
  • This measurement is then used to calculate the area of the land.

Types of Chain Used in Chain Surveying

  • There are many types of chains used in chain surveying, but the most common are the Gunters chain, the engineer’s chain, and the Reidel chain
  • The Gunters chain is the original chain used in surveying and is still used today
  • It is made of 100 links, each measuring 1/100th of a chain (0.66 feet)
  • The engineer’s chain is slightly longer, measuring 66 feet, and is used for measuring larger areas
  • The Reidel chain is the shortest and is used for measuring smaller areas.

The procedure of Chain Surveying

  • In chain surveying, linear measurements are made with a chain or tape to determine the size and/or position of features
  • This type of surveying is used when the feature to be measured is too large or too far away to measure with a more precise surveying instrument
  • This method can also be used to establish survey control over a large area when precise measurements are not required.

Factors To Be Considered During Survey Station Selection

  • There are a number of factors that should be considered when selecting survey station locations
  • The first factor to consider is the purpose of the survey
  • The locations selected should be able to provide the information needed to answer the research question
  • Second, the locations should be easily accessible to the survey team
  • Third, the locations should be representative of the population of interest
  • Fourth, the locations should be safe for the survey team and respondents
  • Fifth, the locations should be free from distractions that could interfere with the survey
  • Sixth, the locations should have enough space to accommodate the survey team and respondents
  • Seventh, the locations should have adequate lighting and ventilation
  • Finally, the locations should be comfortable for the survey team and respondents.

Conclusion

Chain surveying is an old technique used for measuring land. It is a simple process and does not require any sophisticated equipment. This method is mostly used for small areas.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some of the factors to consider when selecting survey station locations for chain surveying?

Some of the factors to consider when selecting survey station locations for chain surveying are the purpose of the survey, the accessibility of the location, the safety of the location, and the comfort of the location.

What are Gunters chains and Reidel chains used for in chain surveying?

Gunters chains are used to measure the length of the line. Reidel chains are used to measure smaller areas.

What are some of the factors to consider when selecting survey station locations for a chain survey?

The first factor to consider is the purpose of the survey. The locations selected should be able to provide the information needed to answer the research question. Second, the locations should be easily accessible to the survey team. Third, the locations should be representative of the population of interest. Fourth, the locations should be safe for the survey team and respondents. Fifth, the locations should be free from distractions that could interfere with the survey. Sixth, the locations should have enough space to accommodate the survey team and respondents. Seventh, the locations should have adequate lighting and ventilation. Finally, the locations should be comfortable for the survey team and respondents.

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